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Evidence in Aceh

5 pieces of evidence found.

Id DLP.Evidence.708
Type Ethnography
Game Meusuëb
Date 1909-01-01 - 1909-12-31
Content "Another game which is much played by women and children, resembles in principle the Javanese dakon and is played with peukula or gentuë seeds or pebbles. Wooden boards are sometimes used for it, but as a rule the required holes are simply made in the ground, the whole being called the uruë' or holes of the game. The little round holes are called rumòh, the big ones A and B geudong or choh and the pips aneu'. The game itself is known in different places under the names chato, chuka', and jungka'. There are four different ways of playing it in Acèh with which I am acquainted, called respectively meusuëb, meuta', meuchoh, meuliëh. Let us here describe the meusuëb as a specimen. The two players put 4 aneu's in each of six small holes. Then they commence to play, each in his turn taking the pips from any one hole selected at hap-hazard and distributing them among the other holes, dropping one in each they pass. The direction followed is from left to right for the six holes next the player, and from right to left in the opposite ones. The player takes the contents of the hole he reaches with his last pip, and goes on playing. Should he reach an empty hole with his last pip he is dead. Should it happen that when the player reaches the last hole which his store of pips enables him to gain, he finds 3 pips therein, he has suëb as it is called, that is to say he may add these 3 to the one he has still remaining and put these 4 as winnings in his geudong. He can then go on playing with the pips in the next hole (adòë suëb = the "younger brother" of the suëb); but if this next hole be empty he may retain the winnings but the turn passes to his opponent. Thus they go on until there are too few pips left outside the two geudongs to play round with. Then each of the players takes one turn with one of the pips which remains over on his own side of the board. If he is compelled to put his pip in one of the holes on the opposite side, he loses it and when all the pips are thus lost the game is finished." Snouck-Hurgronje 1909: 200-201.
Confidence 100
Source Snouck Hurgronje, C. 1906. The Acehnese. trans. by A. W. S. O’Sullivan. Leiden: Brill.

Id DLP.Evidence.781
Type Ethnography
Game Merimüeng-rimüeng-do
Date 1906-01-01 - 1906-12-31
Rules One player plays as the tigers (five in number), the other as the sheep (fifteen in number). They take turns placing the pieces on the intersections of the lines. When all of the player's pieces are on the board, the piece may move to any adjacent intersection along the connecting lines. The tiger hops over a sheep to capture it. The goal of the tiger is to capture all of the sheep; the sheep try to prevent all of the tigers from moving.
Content "The game is played on the second figure here represented with 5 tigers and fifteen sheep. A tiger and a sheep are first placed on the board wherever the player likes. Fresh sheep are added one at a time after each move, so long as the supply lasts. The game ends either when all the sheep are killed, or the tigers hemmed in so as to be unable to move; hence it is called meurimuëng-rimuëng-dò' in contradistinction to the next game." Snouck-Hurgronje 1906: 204.
Confidence 100
Source Snouck Hurgronje, C. 1906. The Acehnese. trans. by A. W. S. O’Sullivan. Leiden: Brill.

Id DLP.Evidence.1488
Type Ethnography
Game Pachih
Date 1906-01-01 - 1906-12-31
Rules Four 3x8 rectangles, arranged in a cross shape around a large central square. The third space, counting from the outer corner, in the two outer rows of each arm of the board are marked with an "X." Two to four players. Four pieces per player. Seven cowrie shells used as dice, the throws as follows: Zero mouths up = 7; one = 10; two = 2; three = 3; four = 4; five = 25; six =30; seven = 14. Throws of 7, 25, 30, and 14 receive an extra throw. Three total throws is the maximum allowed. Pieces begin the game on the top square of the central row of the player's arm of the board. Pieces progress down the central row, then anti-clockwise around the circumference of the board, then up the central row again, to the central space. When a player's piece lands on a spot occupied by an opponent's piece, the opponent's piece is sent back to the starting space. Pieces resting on a marked space cannot be sent back to start; in this case the player's piece as well as the opponent's piece may occupy this space. The first player to bring all four of their pieces to the central space wins.
Content Description of Pachih as played in Aceh in Snouck-Huronje 1906: 201-203. Said to be a favourite game among men.
Confidence 100
Ages Adult
Genders Male
Source Snouck Hurgronje, C. 1906. The Acehnese. trans. by A. W. S. O’Sullivan. Leiden: Brill.

Id DLP.Evidence.1489
Type Ethnography
Game Merimuëng-rimuëng
Date 1906-01-01 - 1906-12-31
Rules 5x5 intersecting lines, with diagonals drawn in the four quadrants of the board. Two triangles, their apices intersecting the main board at opposite midpoints. The bast of the triangle is bisected by a line drawn from the apex, and this line is bisected and intersects with the other two sides of the triangle. one player plays as two tigers, which start on the central point. The other player has 23 sheep, eight of which start on the board, on the points immediately adjacent to the tigers. Pieces move one space along the lines to an empty adjacent spot. The tigers may capture an unbroken line of sheep in one direction, provided there is an unoccupied space at the opposite end of the line. The player with the sheep replaces any captured sheep from those remaining in their hand. The tigers win when they capture all of the sheep; the sheep win when they block the tigers from being able to move.
Content "Certain other games...are known in Aceh until the generic name of merimuëng-rimuëng ("tiger game")...The ruiles of the Acehnese tiger-game are as follows. The two tigers are placed at A, and the eight sheep at B, C, etc. to I, while the player keeps fifteen more sheep one of which he puts on the board whenever one of those in play is killed. Each moves in turn along the lines of the figure. The tiger may take a sheep each time in any direction or even 3, 5, or 7 from one side of the figure to the other, as for example from K to L or from M to N." Snouck-Hurgronje 1906: 203-204.
Confidence 100
Source Snouck Hurgronje, C. 1906. The Acehnese. trans. by A. W. S. O’Sullivan. Leiden: Brill.

Id DLP.Evidence.1490
Type Ethnography
Game Meurimuëng-rimuëng Peuët Ploh
Date 1906-01-01 - 1906-12-31
Rules 9x9 intersecting lines, with diagonals darn in every 4x4 square formed.Forty pieces per player, palced on the board with the central space unoccupied. Players alternate turns moving one piece to an empty adjacent spot. They may capture an opponent's piece by hopping over it. Multiple hops in one turn are allowed, but not required. The first person to capture all of the opponent's pieces wins.
Content "The third game is called "meurimuëng-rimuëng peuët ploh" ("tiger game played with forty") as each player puts forty pieces on the board and the pusat (navel) A remains unoccupied. The players may move and take in every direction and so eventually win, though no one is obliged to take if another move appears more advantageous." Snouck-Hurgronje 1906: 204.
Confidence 100
Source Snouck Hurgronje, C. 1906. The Acehnese. trans. by A. W. S. O’Sullivan. Leiden: Brill.

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