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Evidence in Zimbabwe

11 pieces of evidence found.

Id DLP.Evidence.1882
Type Ethnography
Game Tsoro
Date 1964-01-01 - 1964-12-31
Rules 4x6-21 board; 8 is most common, 12, 15, and 18 are also popular. Two counters in each hole in the players' outer rows. Sowing occurs in an anti-clockwise direction, only in the two rows belonging to the player. When the final counter lands in an occupied hole, these are picked up and sowing continues. When the final counter lands in an empty hole in the inner row, any counters in the opposite hole in the opponent's inner row are captured. If there also are counters in the opposite hole in the opponent's outer row, these are also captured, but only if there was first a capture from the inner row hole. Players cannot sow from a hole with a single counter unless there are no holes with multiple counters. Single counters can only be sown into an empty hole. Play continues until one player has captured all of the opponent's counters, thus winning the game.
Content "Tsoro...the board for the game demands four parallel rows of holes (magomba) about three inches in diameter, hollowed in the ground. There can be any number of holes horizontally. Eight is probably the most common, but vriations between six and 21 are commonly to be met with. 12, 15, and 18 are quite usual. The men are once again small pebbles ()matombo). The way in which they are set out in the variation which I shall take as basic is as follows: (a) The game starts when A picks up two stones from any of his holes. The basic principle is that after picking up he drops one stone into each successive hole, and if his last stone drops into a hole which is already occupied, he picks up all the stones in that hole and carries on until his last stone drops into a vacant hole. He moves in an anti-clockwise direction only around his own two horizontal rows, never into his opponent's. (b) If the last stone (falling into a vacant hole) finishes in a hole in the inner row and both holes vertically opposite him are occupied by his opponent's stones, he removes all those stones from the board. He can only take thus, however, if his opponent has a stone vertically opposite in the inner row. Thus if A is playing and his final stone drops into row II, hole 3, and B has stones in Row iii, hole 3, and Row iv, hole 3, B will lose all these stones. He cannot lose his stones from iv, 3, however, if iii, 3 is not occupied. (c) The object of the game is to take all one's opponent's stones. (d) Until all his holes are occupied by a single stones a player may only commence a move at a hole containing more than one stone. (e) When he reaches the stge wheere all his occupied holes have not more than one stone in them, he may move any of these single stones, provided that it has an empty hole in front of it to move into. At this final stage a stone may never be moved into an occupied hole." Matthews 1964: 64-65.
Confidence 100
Ages Adult
Genders Male
Source Matthews, J. 1964. "Notes on Some African Stone Games." NADA: The Southern Rhodesia Native Affairs Department Annual 9(1): 64-66.

Id DLP.Evidence.1883
Type Ethnography
Game Tsoro (Additional Capture)
Date 1964-01-01 - 1964-12-31
Rules 4x6-21 board; 8 is most common, 12, 15, and 18 are also popular. Two counters in each hole in the players' outer rows. Before the game starts, players choose to make additional captures from one, two, or three holes. Sowing occurs in an anti-clockwise direction, only in the two rows belonging to the player. When the final counter lands in an occupied hole, these are picked up and sowing continues. When the final counter lands in an empty hole in the inner row, any counters in the opposite hole in the opponent's inner row are captured. If there also are counters in the opposite hole in the opponent's outer row, these are also captured, but only if there was first a capture from the inner row hole. The player then captures again, from the agreed-upon number of extra holes, chosen from any of the opponent's holes. Players cannot sow from a hole with a single counter unless there are no holes with multiple counters. Single counters can only be sown into an empty hole. Play continues until one player has captured all of the opponent's counters, thus winning the game.
Content "After a take a player is entitled to make "additional takes" of further stones from any one, two, three...of his opponent's holes, number to be specified before the game starts." Matthews 1964: 66.
Confidence 100
Ages Adult
Spaces Outside, Public
Genders Male
Source Matthews, J. 1964. "Notes on Some African Stone Games." NADA: The Southern Rhodesia Native Affairs Department Annual 9(1): 64-66.

Id DLP.Evidence.1884
Type Ethnography
Game Misoro Tsoro
Date 1964-01-01 - 1964-12-31
Rules 4x6-21 board; 8 is most common, 12, 15, and 18 are also popular. Two counters in each hole in the players' outer rows. Two holes in each player's outer row are selected as misoro. Typically, the left two holes are chosen. Sowing occurs in an anti-clockwise direction, only in the two rows belonging to the player. When the final counter lands in an occupied hole, these are picked up and sowing continues. If this final hole is one of the misoro, the player may choose to end their turn instead of continuing to sow. When the final counter lands in an empty hole in the inner row, any counters in the opposite hole in the opponent's inner row are captured. If there also are counters in the opposite hole in the opponent's outer row, these are also captured, but only if there was first a capture from the inner row hole. Players cannot sow from a hole with a single counter unless there are no holes with multiple counters. Single counters can only be sown into an empty hole. Play continues until one player has captured all of the opponent's counters, thus winning the game.
Content "Two of the back-row (I and iv) holes are nominated as "heads" (musoro, pl. misoro). The ones usually chosen are I, 1 and 2 for A, and iv, 7 and 8 for B. If a player's final stone drops into one of his misoro, he need not pick up all the stones in it and move on as usual unless he chooses. It is thus possible to accumulate a tactical stock-pile ready for a lightning swoop along the front row at the right moment." Matthews 1964: 65.
Confidence 100
Ages Adult
Spaces Outside, Public
Genders Male
Source Matthews, J. 1964. "Notes on Some African Stone Games." NADA: The Southern Rhodesia Native Affairs Department Annual 9(1): 64-66.

Id DLP.Evidence.1885
Type Ethnography
Game Misoro Tsoro
Date 1964-01-01 - 1964-12-31
Rules The leftmost and rightmost holes are misoro. Play starts with two counters in each hole in the outer row for each player, except their rightmost hole which contains three.
Content "If playing Variant 1, and the two misoro chosen are holes 1 and 8 for both players, it is customary to have three stones at the beginning in No. 8 for A and no. 1 for B, as in Variant 2 " (Musero Tsoro in Ludii). Matthews 1964: 66.
Confidence 100
Ages Adult
Spaces Outside, Public
Genders Male
Source Matthews, J. 1964. "Notes on Some African Stone Games." NADA: The Southern Rhodesia Native Affairs Department Annual 9(1): 64-66.

Id DLP.Evidence.1886
Type Ethnography
Game Misoro Tsoro (Additional Capture)
Date 1964-01-01 - 1964-12-31
Rules 4x6-21 board; 8 is most common, 12, 15, and 18 are also popular. Two counters in each hole in the players' outer rows. Two holes in each player's outer row are selected as misoro. Typically, the left two holes are chosen.At the beginning of the game, players choose whether to capture from one, two, or three extra holes. Sowing occurs in an anti-clockwise direction, only in the two rows belonging to the player. When the final counter lands in an occupied hole, these are picked up and sowing continues. If this final hole is one of the misoro, the player may choose to end their turn instead of continuing to sow. When the final counter lands in an empty hole in the inner row, any counters in the opposite hole in the opponent's inner row are captured. If there also are counters in the opposite hole in the opponent's outer row, these are also captured, but only if there was first a capture from the inner row hole. The player also captures the counters from the agreed-upon number of holes on the opponent's side of the board. Counters in misoro cannot be captured with one of these additional captures. Players cannot sow from a hole with a single counter unless there are no holes with multiple counters. Single counters can only be sown into an empty hole. Play continues until one player has captured all of the opponent's counters, thus winning the game.
Content "If playing with a misoro, stones in the misoro cannot be removed in any privileged additional takes described above and are therefore in a position of considerable safety, being exposed only to the normal take." Matthews 1964: 66.
Confidence 100
Ages Adult
Spaces Outside, Public
Genders Male
Source Matthews, J. 1964. "Notes on Some African Stone Games." NADA: The Southern Rhodesia Native Affairs Department Annual 9(1): 64-66.

Id DLP.Evidence.1887
Type Ethnography
Game Musoro Tsoro
Date 1964-01-01 - 1964-12-31
Rules 4x6-21 board; 8 is most common, 12, 15, and 18 are also popular. Each player's rightmost hole is the musoro. Two counters in each hole in the players' outer rows, except each musoro which has three. Sowing occurs in an anti-clockwise direction. When the final counter lands in an occupied hole, these are picked up and sowing continues. If this final hole is one of the musoro, the player may choose to end their turn instead of continuing to sow. When the final counter lands in an empty hole in the inner row, any counters in the opposite hole in the opponent's inner row are captured. If there also are counters in the opposite hole in the opponent's outer row, these are also captured, but only if there was first a capture from the inner row hole. Players cannot sow from a hole with a single counter unless there are no holes with multiple counters. Single counters can only be sown into an empty hole. Play continues until one player has captured all of the opponent's counters, thus winning the game.
Content "Sometimes only one musoro is nominated. In this variation it is obligatorily hole 8 for A, and hole 1 for B. Three stones are put in this hole at the beginning instead of only two. The game then continues as before." Matthews 1964: 65.
Confidence 100
Ages Adult
Spaces Outside, Public
Genders Male
Source Matthews, J. 1964. "Notes on Some African Stone Games." NADA: The Southern Rhodesia Native Affairs Department Annual 9(1): 64-66.

Id DLP.Evidence.1888
Type Ethnography
Game Tsoro (Reentered Captures)
Date 1964-01-01 - 1964-12-31
Rules 4x6-21 board; 8 is most common, 12, 15, and 18 are also popular. Two counters in each hole in the players' outer rows. Sowing occurs in an anti-clockwise direction, only in the two rows belonging to the player. When the final counter lands in an occupied hole, these are picked up and sowing continues. When the final counter lands in an empty hole in the inner row, any counters in the opposite hole in the opponent's inner row are captured. If there also are counters in the opposite hole in the opponent's outer row, these are also captured, but only if there was first a capture from the inner row hole. Captured counters are then sown on the player's own side of the board, starting with the hole following the one from which the capture was triggered. Players cannot sow from a hole with a single counter unless there are no holes with multiple counters. Single counters can only be sown into an empty hole. Play continues until one player has captured all of the opponent's counters, thus winning the game.
Content "After taking any of his opponent's stones the player drops them singly into his next holes and continues as before. Here the stones do not leave the board as is normal but are gradually amassed by one player until his opponent has none left. This is a long and complicated game." Matthews 1964: 66.
Confidence 100
Ages Adult
Spaces Outside, Public
Genders Male
Source Matthews, J. 1964. "Notes on Some African Stone Games." NADA: The Southern Rhodesia Native Affairs Department Annual 9(1): 64-66.

Id DLP.Evidence.1903
Type Ethnography
Game Tsoro (Baia)
Date 1931-01-01 - 1931-12-31
Rules 4x13-19 board. Two counters in every hole, except the leftmost in both of a player's rows, which are empty, and the second from the left in the inner row, which has one. Sowing occurs in an anti-clockwise direction. When the final counter lands in an occupied hole, these counters are picked up and sowing continues. Captures are made when the final counters lands in an empty hole in the inner row, capturing the contents of the opponent's opposite inner row hole, as well as the contents of the outer row hole only if there was a capture from the inner row hole. Captures from extra holes are also made, which are graduated based on the number of captures the player has made. On their first turn, players sow from the third hole from the left in the front row. This triggers a capture of the counters in the opposite holes in the opponent's inner and outer rows, plus the contents of any other five holes on the opponent's side of the board. In subsequent turns, sowing must occur from a hole which follows an empty hole according to the circuit of the holes. On their second capture, the player captures three extra holes. All other subsequent captures capture from two extra holes. Sowing a single counter cannot result in a capture. The player who captures all of their opponent's counters wins.
Content Detailed account of Tsoro as played in Zimbabwe by Tracey 1931: 33-34.
Confidence 100
Source Tracey, H. 1931. "The Rules of the Native Game Tsoro." NADA: The Southern Shodesia Native Affairs Department Annual 9: 33-34.

Id DLP.Evidence.2085
Type Ethnography
Game Tsoro Yemutwelve
Date 1964-01-01 - 1964-12-31
Rules Three concentric squares, with lines connecting the diagonals and the midpoints of the sides. Twelve pieces per player. Players alternate turns placing one of their pieces on one of the empty intersections of the board. If a player places three of their stones in a straight line, the player may remove one of the opponent's pieces. When all of the pieces have been placed, the players alternate turns moving one of their pieces to an empty adjacent point along the lines of the board. When a player is reduced to three pieces, they may move one of their stone to any empty space on the board. The player who reduces their opponent to two pieces wins.
Content Description of Tsoro Yemutwelve as played in Zimbabwe in Matthews 1964: 67-68.
Confidence 100
Ages Child, Adolescent, Adult
Spaces Outside, Public
Genders Male
Source Matthews, J. 1964. "Notes on Some African Stone Games." NADA: The Southern Rhodesia Native Affairs Department Annual 9(1): 64-66.

Id DLP.Evidence.2086
Type Ethnography
Game Tsoro Yemutatu
Date 1964-01-01 - 1964-12-31
Rules 3x3 intersecting lines, with diagonals drawn in the large square. Three pieces per player. Players alternate turns placing a stone on an empty point on the board. When all of the pieces have been placed, players alternate turns moving one of their pieces to any empty point. The first player to place three of their pieces in a line wins.
Content "Tsoro Yemutatu. This, in its various forms, is a very simple form of Tsoro yemutwelve. Each side has only three stones, so that the first person to complete a line is the winner. The stones may be moved anywhere, not just one space. " Matthews 1964: 68.
Confidence 100
Ages Child, Adolescent, Adult
Spaces Outside, Public
Genders Male
Source Matthews, J. 1964. "Notes on Some African Stone Games." NADA: The Southern Rhodesia Native Affairs Department Annual 9(1): 64-66.

Id DLP.Evidence.2087
Type Ethnography
Game Tsoro Yemutatu (Triangle)
Date 1964-01-01 - 1964-12-31
Rules Triangle, with a line from the apex bisecting the base, and a line bisecting this one and the opposite sides. Three pieces per player. Players alternate turns placing a piece on one of the empty points on the board. When all of the pieces have been placed, players alternate turns moving any one of their pieces to the empty point on the board. The first player to make a line of three wins.
Content Description of Tsoro Yemutatu with a triangle board as played in Zimbabwe in Matthews 1964: 68.
Confidence 100
Ages Child, Adolescent, Adult
Spaces Outside, Public
Genders Male
Source Matthews, J. 1964. "Notes on Some African Stone Games." NADA: The Southern Rhodesia Native Affairs Department Annual 9(1): 64-66.

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