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Evidence in Madagascar

4 pieces of evidence found.

Id DLP.Evidence.661
Type Ethnography
Game Fanorona
Date 1896-01-01 - 1896-12-31
Rules 9x5 intersecting lines with diagonals. Each player has 22 pieces, starting on the intersections of the lines except in the centre position. Pieces move to an adjacent intersection along the lines. Players must capture pieces when possible. Capturing is accomplished by moving to an adjacent intersection to an opposing piece in the continuing direction of the capturing stones movement, or by moving away from an adjacent opposing pieces in such a direction. When an opponent's piece is captured, all other of the opponent's pieces in that line are also captured. Multiple captures can be made, but cannot be done by moving twice in the same direction. Multiple captures are optional. A player wins by capturing all of the other player's pieces.
Content "The fanorona board is a rectangular parallelogram, divided into 31 equal squares. Gather these, in your eye, into eight larger squares, containing four each; draw the diagonal lines in each of the eight, and the fanorona figure is complete. Forty-four movable plieces are required for the game—twenty-two on each side. With the Malagasy these are usually little pebbles and potsherds, or beans and berries. We, however, will cal then the Black and the White pieces. The two players sit opposite each other, having the long sides of the fanorona adjacent to them. The pieces are then arranged on the corners of the angle-points, not on the squares, as in chess or draught. There are five of these long lines on the board, each containing, of course, nine angle-points, and the pieces are thus arranges: Black: First line 1.....9 Second Line 1....9 White: Fourth Line 1.....9 Fifth Line 1.....9 The third, or central line, is occupied by the eight remaining pieces, placed alternately thus: Black 1, 3, 6, 8 White 2, 4, 7, 9 One point remains unoccupied, the central angle-point of the board, the fifth and the third line. The represents the royal seat in the public gatherings, but in the fanorona game it is called the fòibény (navel). The object aimed at by each of the players is, as in draughts, to remove the whole of the adversary's pieces from the board... First, that a piece may be moved in any direction—forward, backward, sideways, or diagonally, to the first station in a direction, if such station be vacant. Second. If there be now no other vacant station between the attacking piece just moved and the enemy's piece along that line, these, whatever their number, are captured at once, as far as they stand in unbroken order on the line attacked. If, however, a vacant position occurs in their line, or another hostile piece is among them, then only the piece or pieces nearest the assailant are captured. Thirdly. The pieces of the enemy may be captured by a retreat as well as by an advance. A piece that has been standing in an adjoining station to some piece or pieces of the enemy may capture it or them by retreating one point along that line, if such point happens to be vacant. The limitation defined immediately above applies in this case also. Fourthly. At the beginning of a game one move only is permitted to the first side. After that side has moved once, any piece that is moved is permitted to run amuck in the enemy's lines, and to go on as long as he finds foes to capture, provided (a) that he does not return immediately to any point he has just left, and (b) that he does not take a foe behind him immediately after taking one in front of him, nor one on his right hand immediately after taking on his left hand, and vice versa. "Don't eat at both ends, like a leech," says the Malagasy proverb..." Montgomery 1896: 151-155.
Confidence 100
Source Montgomery, W. 1896. The Malagasy game of Fanorona. The Antananarivo Annual and Madagascar Magazine 3: 148–157.

Id DLP.Evidence.1667
Type Ethnography
Game Fanorona Telo
Date 1951-01-01 - 1951-12-31
Rules 3x3 intersecting lines with diagonals. Play occurs on the intersections of the lines. Each player has three pieces. Play begins with each player placing pieces on empty points. If they make three in a row along the lines, they win. Once all pieces are place, players take turns moving pieces one spot to an adjacent point along the lines trying to make three in a row.
Content "3.3.19. Madagascar: Fanorona telo (Mrs. Danielli). PLayed by Imerina children." Presented as Three Men's Morris. Murray 1951: 42.
Confidence 100
Ages Child
Source Murray, H.J.R. 1951. A History of Board-Games Other Than Chess. Oxford: Clarendon Press.

Id DLP.Evidence.1777
Type Ethnography
Game Véla
Date 1896-01-01 - 1896-12-31
Rules 9x5 intersecting lines with diagonals in each square formed by 3x3 intersecting lines. Each player has 22 pieces, starting on the intersections of the lines except in the centre position. Pieces move to an adjacent intersection along the lines. In the first phase of play, one player cannot capture until they have been reduced to five pieces. The opponent may only capture, according to the following rules, but only one piece at a time is captured, even when multiple would normally be allowed. When the one player is reduced to five pieces, play continues as follows. Players must capture pieces when possible. Capturing is accomplished by moving to an adjacent intersection to an opposing piece in the continuing direction of the capturing stones movement, or by moving away from an adjacent opposing pieces in such a direction. When an opponent's piece is captured, all other of the opponent's pieces in that line are also captured. Multiple captures can be made, but cannot be done by moving twice in the same direction. Multiple captures are optional. A player wins by capturing all of the other player's pieces.
Content "The new form of the game is called Véla...The véla game is opened by the victor, who puts forward such of his pieces as he chooses to surrender to his antagonist. These pieces may only be taken singly, and the generous conqueror refrains from taking any of his enemy's pieces, until he has parted with, one by one, 17 of his own pieces; then, with the remaining five., he begins his campaign against the undiminished forces of his antagonist...if the [player] is again defeated, he is only allowed to play the véla form of the game until he has redeemed himself by a victory." Montgomery 1896: 155.
Confidence 100
Ages All
Social status All
Genders All
Source Montgomery, W. 1896. The Malagasy game of Fanorona. The Antananarivo Annual and Madagascar Magazine 3: 148–157.

Id DLP.Evidence.2052
Type Ethnography
Game Fifangha
Date 1648-01-01 - 1658-12-31
Rules 4x8 board. The end holes in the inner rows are the first Chibou, the next holes in are the second Chibou. Sixty-four counters. Play begins with one counter in each hole in each player's inner row, except the first Chibou. Players alternate turns taking one counter from the remaining counters, and placing it in an occupied hole on the board. Placing a counter in an occupied hole allows the player to capture any counters from the hole in the opponent's opposite row, and places these captured counters into one of their first Chibou. This move can only be made when a capture is possible, and must be made if possible. If this is not possible, the player may sow in any direction from an occupied hole. If the final counter of a sowing lands in an occupied hole, these are picked up and sowing continues.
Content Account from Flacourt: "Ils ont...le jeu du Fifangha....Le Fifangha est un jeu d'esprit, comme l'autre est d'addresse, il tient du jeu de dame et du tricquetrac, on joue avec de certain fruits ronds qu'il nomment Baßy, sur une tablette de bois, ou il y a trente deux trous en quatre rangs, seize servans à un joueur et seize à l'autre. il faut avoir chacun trente-deux bassi: Ce jeu est assez recreatif. Les premiers trous ou cases marquez A, sont les premieres Chibou, dont il y en a quatre. Ces cases marqueees B, sont les seconds Chibou, dont il y en à aussi quatre. Celles qui sont marquées D, sont les cases de derriere ou de dehors, qui sont seize. L'on joue avec soixante et quatre boulettes que l'on nomme baßy, lesquelles on met en un ou deux reservoirs qu'il y a à une ou aux deux extremitez du jeu, l'on peut jouer aussi avec les jettons. L'on garnit premierement les douze cases du milieu de chacun un baßy, avec les quatre seconds chibou: puis le premier joueur porte un bassy dans une des cases de milieu des deux seconds chibou qui sont de son costé, et prend le baßy dans le case opposite à celle ou il a placé son baßy, et le porte dans un des deux premiers chibou, qui sont de son costé. L'autre joueur a un bassi en sa main et le place dans un des deux chibou, ou une des quatre cases du milieu, qui sont de son costé, et prend le bassy de la case opposite, et le porte à un des deux premier chibou qui sont de son costé. Le premier joueur prend un bassi dans le reservoir et le place dans une des cases de son costé, et prend le bassi opposite, et le porte au premier chibou de son costé, et s'il y a un bassi dans le chibou opposite, il le prend avec ceux qui sont dans son premier chibou; puis en porte une dans le second chibou, qui est de son costé et porte un autre dans une case et le dernier qu'il a en sa main dans le case qui suit, et si en l'opposite il y a une bassi, il le prend et le porte dans le premier chibou qui a de garni. Le second joueur en fait de mesme de son costé, et quand les chibou et cases de votre costé sont degarnies, vous avez perdu, et de mesme à l'pposite, et cela s'appelle camou. L'on ne peut jaimas porter de bassi dans une case où il n'y a rien, comme aussi quand il y a à prendre, on est obligé de prendre: mais si les cases à l'opposite de celles oà vous avez des bassi, sont degarnies, et que les autres cases de votre aversaire qui ne sont pas opposit es à celle qui sont garnies devant vous, soient garnies, vous faites los mamoueatsrha: c'est que vous portez un bassi dans une de vos cases garnies, et vous prenez avec celui que vous y avez mis tous les bassi qui y sont, et en portez un à droit ou à gauche, comme voudrez dans la case prochaine, l'autre ensuivant, jusques à ce que le dernier bassi soit posé s'il y a un bassi, ou plusieurs dans cette derniere case, vous enlevez encores tout, et en garnissez une case ensuivant, comme vous avez commencé: et si vous êtes au premier Chibou de ce costé là, et qu'il vous en reste dans la main, vous les portez aux casesde derriere, et s'il y en avoit tant en votre main; que toutes les cases de derriere fussent garnies chachune de ceux que vous y auriez mis, vous porterez le reste au premier Chibou suivant, en continuant jusqu'a ce que vous ayez trouvé une case vide oà vous laissex le dernier bassi, et ecla s'appelle Mandre, c'est à dire dormir ou se reposer. Le jeu est assex recreatif, et s'apprend plus facilement en jouant que de parole. L'on peut au lieu de baßy jouer avec des jettons." Flacourt 1658: 108-110.
Confidence 100
Source Flacourt, È. 1658. Histoire de la grande isle Madagascar. Paris: Pierre Bien-fait.

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