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Evidence for Backgammon

2 pieces of evidence found.

Id DLP.Evidence.797
Type Contemporary rule description
Location England
Date 1753-01-01 - 1753-12-31
Rules The game is played on a board with twelve points on either side. The points form a continuous track in a horseshoe shape; each player progresses in opposite directions (one from their bottom right to the top right, the other from their bottom left to their top left. Each player has 15 pieces. The starting position is as such, number the points from the origin of each player's track: Point six: five pieces Point 8: three pieces Point 13: five pieces Point 24: two pieces Ply begins by each player rolling one die; the player who rolls the most plays first and plays the numbers on this first roll. Players move according to the number on each die by moving one piece the number on one die and other the number on the other die, or by moving one piece the total number of both die. If doubles are rolled, the player must play the number on each die twice. Players cannot end their move on a point with multiple opposing pieces. If a player ends the turn on a point with one opposing piece, that piece is placed in the middle of the board (not on a point) and must reenter the board according the the next die roll, counting the origin point as a move of 1. They cannot reenter on a point with two or more pieces. No other pieces can move until all of the pieces belonging to that player are removed from the center. When all of a player's pieces are on their final 6 points, they may start removing pieces from the board. They can do so by rolling a 6 to move from the 6th point, and so on down to 1. Players must use all available moves presented by the dice. The first player to remove all of their pieces wins.
Content "A Short Treatise on the Game of Backgammon." Hoyle 1753.
Confidence 100
Source Hoyle, E. 1753. A Short Treatise on the Game of Backgammon. Dublin: George and Alexander Ewing.

Id DLP.Evidence.1564
Type Rules text
Location England
Date 1674-01-01 - 1674-12-31
Rules The game is played on a board with twelve points on either side. The points form a continuous track in a horseshoe shape; each player progresses in opposite directions (one from their bottom right to the top right, the other from their bottom left to their top left. Each player has 15 pieces. The starting position is as such, number the points from the origin of each player's track: Point six: five pieces Point 8: three pieces Point 13: five pieces Point 24: two pieces Play begins by each player rolling one die; the player with the highest roll plays first and plays the numbers on this first roll. Players move according to the number on each die by moving one piece the number on one die and other the number on the other die, or by moving one piece the total number of both die. If doubles are rolled, the player must play the number on each die twice. Players cannot end their move on a point with multiple opposing pieces. If a player ends the turn on a point with one opposing piece, that piece is placed in the middle of the board (not on a point) and must reenter the board according the the next die roll, counting the origin point as a move of 1. They cannot reenter on a point with two or more pieces. No other pieces can move until all of the pieces belonging to that player are removed from the center. When all of a player's pieces are on their final 6 points, they may start removing pieces from the board. They can do so by rolling a 6 to move from the 6th point, and so on down to 1. Players must use all available moves presented by the dice. The first player to remove all of their pieces wins.
Content "CHAP. XXVII. Of Back-Gammon. YOur men are placed as at Irish, and Back-Gammon differs but very little from it, but in Doublets which at this Game is plaid fourfold, which makes a quicker dispatch of the Game than Irish. Be sure to make good your Trey, Ace-points, hit boldly and come away as fast as you can, to which end if your Dice run high, you will make the quicker dispatch. When you come to bearing have a care of making when you need not, and Doublets now will stand you most in stead. If both bear together he that is first off without Doublets wins one. If both bear and one goes off with Doublets he wins two. If your Tables be clear before your Adversaries men be come in, that's a Back-Gammon, which is three; but if you thus go off with Doublets it is four." Cotton 1674: 156-157.
Confidence 100
Source Cotton, C. 1674. The Compleat Gamester, or, Instructions How to play at Billiards, Trucks, Bowls, and Chess Together with all Manner of Usual and Most Gentile Games either on Cards or Die: to which is Added the Arts and Mysteries of Riding, Racing, Archery, and Cock-Fighting. London: R. Cutler.

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