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Evidence for Juroku Musashi

3 pieces of evidence found.

Id DLP.Evidence.1232
Type Ethnography
Location Japan
Date 1898-01-01 - 1898-12-31
Rules 5x5 intersecting lines, with the diagonals of every 2x2 square formed. On one side, a triangle, with the apex intesecting with the midpoint of that side. There is a line from the apex to the midpoint of the triangle's base, and another interior triangle, connecting the base of the larger triangle with the midpoints of the sides of the larger triangle. One player plays as the Taisho ("general"), the other as sixteen musashi ("soliders"). The Taisho begins in the central point, the musashi on each point of the perimeter of the square board. Players take turns moving from one point to an adjacent point along the lines on the board. The Taisho may capture a musashi by hopping over it. The musashi win if they are able to immobilize the Taisho, or if they confine the Taisho to the triangle.
Content "57. MJuroku Musashi. "Sixteen Soldiers." The Japanese Game of fox and Gees. Japan. (a) Board and men. (b) Japanese picture of players. The board has 8 by 8 squares, each of which is divided into two parts by a diagonal line (fig. 177). In the games now current in Japan there is a triangle at the top of the board two squares wide, with its apex resting upon the middle of the upper side. Sixteen men (musashi, "soldiers") are arranged at the sixteen points of intersection at the sides of the square with the Taisho, or General, in the center. Two play, the "General" striving to capture the "Soldiers," and the latter to block him." Culin 1898: 874.
Confidence 100
Source Culin, S. 1898. Chess and Playing-Cards. Washington: Government Printing Office.

Id DLP.Evidence.1233
Type Contemporary rule description
Location Japan
Date 1951-01-01 - 1951-12-31
Rules 5x5 intersecting lines, with the diagonals of every 2x2 square formed. On one side, a triangle, with the apex intesecting with the midpoint of that side. There is a line from the apex to the midpoint of the triangle's base, and another connecting the midpoints of the sides of the triangle. One player plays as the Taisho ("general"), the other as sixteen musashi ("soliders"). The Taisho begins in the central point, the musashi on each point of the perimeter of the square board. Players take turns moving from one point to an adjacent point along the lines on the board. Only the Taisho may enter the triangle. The Taisho may capture a musashi by hopping over it. The Taisho wins if it captures all the musashi. The musashi win if they are able to immobilize the Taisho, or if they confine the Taisho to the triangle.
Content "5.2.3. Japan: Juroku Musashi 'sixteen soldiers' (...Prof. Tsuboi). Played on board B, Fig. 45, which is copied from a board (no.7090) in the Museum of Archaeology, University of Pennsylvania. When Prof. Tsuboi drew the board for me, he omitted the two shorter lines in the triangle. One player has a general (taisho) and the other sixteen soldiers (musashi) which are arranged as in the diagram. All the pieces have the same move, one step along a marked line through the point on which the piece stands, but the general alone can enter the triangle, and if he is confined to it, he loses. The general alone can capture, and he does so by the short leap of the draughtsman. The general wins if he takes all the soldiers, and the soldiers win if they reduce the general to immobility or confine him to the triangle." Murray 1951: 101.
Confidence 100
Ages Adult
Genders Male
Source Murray, H.J.R. 1951. A History of Board-Games Other Than Chess. Oxford: Clarendon Press.

Id DLP.Evidence.1234
Type Artistic depiction
Location Japan
Date 1700-01-01 - 1894-12-31
Rules 5x5 intersecting lines, with the diagonals of every 2x2 square formed. On one side, a triangle, with the apex intersecting with the midpoint of that side. There is a line from the apex to the midpoint of the triangle's base, and another connecting the midpoints of the sides of the triangle. Three players possible?
Content Print from Japan showing women playing Juroku Musashi in a house. It appears that three women are playing, with three colors of pieces on the board. University of Pennsylvania Museum 17832. Culin 1898: 874.
Confidence 100
Ages Adult
Social status Elite
Spaces Inside
Genders Female
Source Culin, S. 1898. Chess and Playing-Cards. Washington: Government Printing Office.

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