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Entry in Table Games for author value Dale W. Walton

Id 723
Name Abrobad
NativeName
Description Abrobad is arabic, for "Windswept Clouds" refering to the art of making swirled patterns by adding pigments on the surface of a liquid and blowing on them, e.g. to make fancy "marblized" book end papers. The game is a race to connect one's pieces into the fewest possible groups, and as large gaps are impossible, it results in an abrobad visual effect. It may be played on any size hexagonal "limping" board grid.
MainRuleset 851
LudiiRuleset 851
Reference BGG
Origin
DLPGame 0
PublicGame 1
knownAliases Abr-Bad, Clouds and Wind
Author Dale W. Walton
Publisher
Date 2019-11-18
ProprietaryGame 0
Credit Dale W. Walton
SeeAlso
BGGId
OriginPoint
EvidenceRange 0,5520
WishlistGame 0
Notes
HelpUs 0
ForceRulesetInLud 0

Id 759
Name RootZone
NativeName
Description RootZone is an experimental territorial placement meta-game of the Mycilleum family (i.e. group growth), but based on growth from edges inward, with a goal of largest group, and prohibition on touching enemy positions. The game is played on a triangular grid in the shape of a hexagon that has alternating edges of 2N and 2N+2. This shape is chosen to avoid play points at the center of the board or of its edges. The implementation provides a selection of restrictions on the neighborhood of the piece being placed. Non-looping option has not been implemented. The standard is placement next to any number of friendly pieces, but not next to pieces with more than 3 neighbors. Please comment to author about which variants you prefer and why.
MainRuleset 889
LudiiRuleset 889
Reference Dale W. Walton (BGG)
Origin
DLPGame 0
PublicGame 1
knownAliases
Author Dale W. Walton
Publisher
Date 2020-09-16
ProprietaryGame 0
Credit Dale W. Walton
SeeAlso
BGGId
OriginPoint
EvidenceRange 0,5520
WishlistGame 0
Notes
HelpUs 0
ForceRulesetInLud 0

Id 980
Name Infuse
NativeName
Description Infuse is a game of entering the most pieces. They can only enter out of sight of your own pieces, but you make move your pieces that lie near to enemy pieces, in order to make new entry sites for yourself, or block entry sites for your opponent. The game may be played on either hex or square grids.
MainRuleset 1142
LudiiRuleset 1142
Reference BGG
Origin
DLPGame 0
PublicGame 1
knownAliases
Author Dale W. Walton
Publisher
Date 2020-11-19
ProprietaryGame 0
Credit Dale W. Walton
SeeAlso
BGGId
OriginPoint
EvidenceRange 0,5520
WishlistGame 0
Notes
HelpUs 0
ForceRulesetInLud 0

Id 991
Name Refugia
NativeName
Description Refugia is a modern experimental game with a goal of consolidating stones. Stones enter unconnected, and can only move by fleeing from concentrations of enemy stones. Thus it is a movement game with a territorial aspect. The game includes capture-by-hopping moves, which create mutual-enemy stones as an intermediate stage before possible reconversion back to player's stones. This mechanism keeps the game provably finite. The pseudo-territories formed by the clumps of stones, have boundaries that can erode and shift; so the game is more tactical than strategic. Shifts in strategic concerns do occur, however, as the game evolves from first mainly claiming territory by placement density, to a race to agglomerate or capture, to fights to recapture vs blocking to retain lead in a tactical end game. Because the effect of the mutual-enemy stones on movement is symmetrical but not the same for the two players, the game requires considerable mental concentration.
MainRuleset 1153
LudiiRuleset 1153
Reference BGG
Origin
DLPGame 0
PublicGame 1
knownAliases
Author Dale W. Walton
Publisher
Date 2020-12-11
ProprietaryGame 0
Credit Dale W. Walton
SeeAlso
BGGId
OriginPoint
EvidenceRange 0,5520
WishlistGame 0
Notes
HelpUs 0
ForceRulesetInLud 0

Id 997
Name Hops-a-Daisy Generalized
NativeName
Description Equi-based games are games played on a hex grid that share the following properties: Each player has two kinds of pieces, one kind (Discs) move using steps and/or hops with flip-captures, the other kind (Hexes) are stationary. The stationary pieces have more score value, and they are limited to certain sites of placement. Identifying the placement sites for the stationary Hex pieces is based on their having an equal number of influencing neighbor pieces belonging to the player and to his (selected) enemy. Turns consist of either: placing any a piece, or moving a Disc. The Disc move may be followed by optionally placing a Hex piece. The game ends when in succession, none of the players adds a piece to the board. The winner is the player who has the highest score, with the first player not to place a piece winning in the case of a tiebreaker. In the original game of Equi, The influencing neighbor pieces were found along lines of sight, and included only those pieces that were at the same distance as the nearest of them. The original game also had special placement limitations not discussed here, to reduce cycling. These evolved into produce the version cited here. Areas of variation. The main families are: 1. Equi - Line of sight based rules, forced flip-hopping of enemy pieces, and optional friendly hops, piece values same magnitude, but opposite sign. Details are that moving Disc pieces can only be entered onto non-Equi sites and not to suicide sites. The game is intended as a 2 player strategy game. Equiversi - intended to be easier to play and more territorial and have less cycling issues. The first change was to replace line of sight influence with adjacent piece influence, that is easier to see. With the increase in hex placement opportunities thus available, friendly hops were disallowed. Then a second evolution, Equiversi-2, occurred with the concept of allowing players to decide a range of piece values for the Discs prior to play, -- represented here only by the selection of a zero value. Reduced value allowed for a relaxation of all placement restrictions on the Discs. An implementation side effect is that selecting a site gives a piece-choice pop-up for those sites where Hexes may be played. Pre-selecting the piece to play would be a better implementation. Evolution to Hops-a-Daisy Nothing in the game prohibits a multi-player implementation, except that king-making could be an issue. Thus the idea of a small, light multi-player game based on Equi was born. To increase the chaotic experience, the hop changes both piece type and ownership leading to entirely different strategies. Hops-a-Daisy default rules allow hopping any piece, 'morphing' it (changing its type). Opponent's pieces are flipped to the mover's ownership as well. For ease of play, Disc placement is either to Non-Hex sites or unlimited. Hex placement considers all opponents as enemies. These settings can be changed to restrict hopping and/or Hex placement rules to either the preceding or following player's pieces. The game is strictly for fun and thus should be played on a small board. These games also inspired Refugia, with different placement restrictions, single piece types, and ownership changes taking place in stages, which has been implemented separately on Ludii.
MainRuleset 1159
LudiiRuleset 1159
Reference
Origin
DLPGame 0
PublicGame 1
knownAliases
Author Dale W. Walton
Publisher
Date 2020-12-26
ProprietaryGame 0
Credit Dale W. Walton
SeeAlso
BGGId
OriginPoint
EvidenceRange 0,5520
WishlistGame 0
Notes
HelpUs 0
ForceRulesetInLud 0

Id 1066
Name Throngs
NativeName
Description Throngs a highly abstracted wargame (territorial invasion game) for two players. It is typically played on the intersections of a triangular grid, using Go stones. It is a double-move game: each player takes 2 full turns in succession before the next player takes control. Movement: The game is distinguished by the way the power of a moving piece is determined according to the pieces around it: A piece can move as far as the difference in count of the friends and enemies in its immediate vicinity. Removing an enemy and adding one's own piece take one power unit each. Remaining power goes into a series of steps or hops that may change direction at empty locations. Strategy: Power to travel up to seven units per move can be developed during the game. As the offensive capacity develops, defensive measures are needed, first starting with limiting the mobility of enemy stones by approaching them, then by building walls, and thickening them along the axes of the opponent's catapulting sites (empty locations surrounded by many of that player's own stones.) These sites allow adding a stone and catapulting it up to a distance of 5, and are re-useable. In addition to these methods, defense is by scattering stones behind one's own lines to immobilise enemy stones that invade. The majority of turns naturally involve placement as well as movement, due to the benefit of gaining material; even though newly placed stones travel a reduced distance due to the cost of their placement. Occasional moves without placement are used mainly to initiate difficult invasions, as they risk simultaneously opening up positional weaknesses. Individual stones may be captured by replacement when they are sufficiently out-numbered at a location, which means that towards the end of the game, chains of stones not anchored to a triangle, loop, or board edge will be consumed one-by-one by captures. Thus the shape and nature of territorial walls is worth contesting. Boards: The standard board is centerless, designed to allow maximal distance moves from the center, while minimizing the size of the board. The hexagonal corner regions help to stabilize invasions in outlying areas. The reverse angles along the edge are slightly less defensible than the other parts, breaking the edges into stategic zones. The game is easily adapted not only to to different size and shape boards, but also to different grid topologies, while remaining interesting and playable. A 'perforated' grid is included to demonstrate this, but there are many other possibilities as well. The center of the board is very advantageous, and a pie rule or balanced starting positions are needed. The standard starting position places the initial pieces near the edges to allow players a wider variety of strategies. Placing multiple starting stones, and or playing on torus boards, leads to finer grained, denser, highly tactical games, while using few starting pieces and larger boards or boards with less connectivity (e.g. boards with holes, and boards on semi-regular grids) lead to a more territorial game. Play on a torus also eliminates the advantage of a board center, but requires a larger board because invasion is no longer from a single direction.
MainRuleset 1224
LudiiRuleset 1224
Reference BGG Forum
Origin
DLPGame 0
PublicGame 1
knownAliases
Author Dale W. Walton
Publisher
Date 2019-11-18
ProprietaryGame 0
Credit Dale W. Walton 2020-11-11
SeeAlso
BGGId
OriginPoint
EvidenceRange 0,5520
WishlistGame 0
Notes
HelpUs 0
ForceRulesetInLud 0

Id 1167
Name Goats Wintering
NativeName
Description 'Goats Wintering' gives the impression of goats gathering into herds in a sheltered area as winter approaches. The goal is to maximize the connections between the goats. However, goats may not be placed too close to others of their kind along sight-lines. So there is tension in who can place and move their goats together most efficiently. The novel movement mechanism is that a goat's movement is restricted to steps that increase its friendly contact, -- or, when increasing friendly contact is not avaiable to it, steps that decrease its contact with competing goats. When goats get close enough to others of their kind, they can then thus move to join a flock and increase the connections. But frequently they will need the presence of the opponent's goats to be able to get this close to their own flocks. This is because goats allow movement choices for any goats near them: isolated goats can't move. So, the tension is in finding places to enter one's goats that are at a suitable range to gather them together. There is capture: Moves that fully surround any of the opponents goats cause those goats to leave the play area. To prevent cycling, the subordinate kind of goat move is not allowed after a pass. This allows a player with a strong lead to pass until the other player runs out of moves and the game ends. The game is inspired from Infuse by the same Author, but the clumping here is more open and pronounced and clumps are distance-limited, not line-of-sight limited. It may be played on either hex grids with adjacent movement, or square grids with ortho-diagonal diagonal movement.
MainRuleset 1327
LudiiRuleset 1327
Reference
Origin
DLPGame 0
PublicGame 1
knownAliases
Author Dale W. Walton
Publisher
Date 2020-11-19
ProprietaryGame 0
Credit Dale W. Walton
SeeAlso
BGGId
OriginPoint
EvidenceRange 0,5520
WishlistGame 0
Notes
HelpUs 0
ForceRulesetInLud 0

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