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Tsatsarandi

Period Modern

Region Western Africa

Category Board, War, Chaturanga

Description

Tsatsarandi is a capturing game that was played by the Kanuri people of Nigeria. Very few people still played it in the early twentieth century, and it was said to have been played during the time of the Kanem-Bornu Empire.

Rules

8x8 board. Pieces have specific moves, as follows: Mai (x1): moves one space in any direction; Chiroma (x1): Moves one space diagonally; Bintu (x2): moves exactly two spaces diagonally, jumping over the first square; Fer (x2): moves orthogonally one space and then diagonally another space, jumping over any intervening pieces; Kaigamma (x2): moves orthogonally any distance; Gollo: (x8) move one space forward orthogonally, or one space diagonally forward to capture. Pieces capture the opponent's pieces by moving onto the spot they occupy. No en passant; no castling. When the Mai can be captured at the beginning of the opponent's next turn, it is in check and must be removed from this state on the player's turn. If this is not possible, it is checkmate and the player who threatened the Mai wins.

Harris 1939: 31-32.

Origin

Nigeria

Concepts

Browse all concepts for Tsatsarandi here.

Reference

Meek 1934.

Evidence Map

2 pieces of evidence in total. Browse all evidence for Tsatsarandi here.

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Sources

Harris, P. 1939. "Chess in Bornu: Nigeria." Man 39: 31-32.

Meek, C. 1934. "Chess in Bornu, Nigeria." Man 34: 33.

Identifiers

DLP.Games.1259

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