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Bao Ki Arabu (Zanzibar 2) (Bao, Bao Kiarabu)

Period(s)

Modern

Region(s)

Eastern Africa

Categories

Board, Sow, Four rows.

Description

Bao Ki Arabu is one of two mancala-style games by the same name is played by people in Zanzibar, where it is said to have been the original version that came to the island from Arabia. Indeed, it is quite similar to Hawalis, which has been documented in Oman. The board is made up of four rows of seven holes.

Rules

Play begins with two counters in each hole Sowing occurs in an anti-clockwise direction. When the last counter falls into an occupied hole, the counters in it are picked up and sowing continues. Sowing ends when the last counter falls into an empty hole. When this hole is in the inner row, the counters in the opponent's inner row opposite it are captured; if there are also counters in the opponent's outer row opposite, these are also captured, but not if the inner row is empty. Play continues until one player has lost all of their counters.

Ingrams 1931: 256-257.

Origin

Zanzibar

Ludeme Description

Bao Ki Arabu (Zanzibar 2).lud

Leaderboard

Bao Ki Arabu (Zanzibar 2)

Evidence Map

1 pieces of evidence in total. Browse all evidence for Bao Ki Arabu (Zanzibar 2) here.

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Sources

Ingrams, W. H. 1931. Zanzibar: Its History and People. London: H. F. & G. Witherby.

Identifiers

DLP.Game.355

BGG.14186

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