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Evidence in Zuni

6 pieces of evidence found.

Id DLP.Evidence.751
Type Ethnography
Game Awithlaknan Mosona
Date 1903-01-01 - 1903-12-31
Rules Stones are placed on intersections, on all except the center. The first player moves to the center, pieces are captured by jumping. Moves must be along the lines.
Content "AWE THLACNAWE. (" STONES KILL.") Implements. - A number of small stones (a different color for each side), and geometrical markings on a stone slab or on the ground. There is no specified size for the "board," it being larger or smaller according to the number of angles. The stones are placed on all the intersections of the geometrical drawing except the central one. The first player moves to the center, where his "man" is jumped by his opponent. The stones may be moved in any direction so long as the lines are followed." Stevenson 1903: 496-497.
Confidence 100
Source Stevenson, M. C. 1903. Zuñi Games. American Anthropologist 5(3): 468-497.

Id DLP.Evidence.752
Type Ethnography
Game Awithlaknan Mosona
Date 1902-01-01 - 1903-12-31
Rules A series of three parallel lines are drawn, with diagonals connecting the outer lines at intervals, crossing each other at the central line, black and white pieces; center space left empty.
Content "Zuni. Zuni, New Mexico. (Cat. no. 5049, Brooklyn Institute Museum.) Long stone slab, inscribed with the diagram shown in figure 111. This was found by the writer on a house top in Zuñi, and was explained by the natives as used in a game with white and black pieces, played like the preceding. The positions of the pieces at the beginning of the game are indicated by black and white circles. The name of the game was given as kolowis awithlaknannai, the kolowisi being a mythic serpent. Another form of the same game (figure 1112) was made for the writer by Zuñi Nick (Nick Graham), who described it under the name of awithlaknan moson, the original awithlaknannai." Culin 1907: 801.
Confidence 100
Source Culin, S. 1907. Games of the North American Indians. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.

Id DLP.Evidence.1186
Type Contemporary rule description
Game Awithlaknakwe
Date 1893-01-01 - 1893-12-31
Rules 2x12 board, with a line of six extra squares centered on each side. Diagonals in every square. Pieces are played on the intersections of lines. Played with two or four players; with four players, the top and left players play against the bottom and right players. Six pieces per player, with one larger piece. Each player's six pieces begin on the central intersection of the extra spaces. Pieces move one spot at a time diagonally. When a player surrounds an opponent's piece on two opposite sides, this piece is captured. The piece is then replaced by the larger piece, which may move diagonally or orthogonally. Pieces may not move backward.When all of the players' remaining pieces reach the starting squares of the opponent, the player with the most captured pieces wins.
Content "Zuñi. Zuñi, New Mexico...for the game of awithlaknakwe, or stone warriors,and twenty-six pieces, or men, consisting of disks made from shards of pottery, used in the game. The disks are in two sets, twelve plain and twelve perforated, with a hole in the center...In addition, there are two pieces, one plain and one perforated, somewhat larger than the others. These implements were made in 1893 by M. Frank Hamilton Cushing who furnished the following account of the game: Played by two or four persons upon a square board, each intersected by diagonal lines. At the opening of the game each player places six men in the center of the six squares at his side of the board. The latter usually consists of a slab of stone pecked with the diagram. The men consist of disks of pottery about 1 inch in diameter, made from broken vessels, those upon one side being distinguished by being perforated with a small hole, while those on the other side are plain. The object of the game is to cross over and take the opponent's place, capturing as many men as possible by the way. The moves are made one square at a time along the diagonal lines, the pieces being placed at the points of intersection. When a player gets one of his opponent's pieces between two of his own, it may be taken, and the first piece thus captured may be replaced by a seventh man, call the Priest of the Bow, which may move both on the diagonal lines and on those at right angles. A piece may not be moved backward. When four persons play, those on the north and west play against those on the south and east." Culin 1907: 799.
Confidence 100
Source Culin, S. 1907. Games of the North American Indians. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.

Id DLP.Evidence.1595
Type Ethnography
Game Tasholiwe
Date 1898-01-01 - 1898-12-31
Rules Forty stones, arranged in a circle, with a larger gap (called a door) after every tenth stone. Two or four players, each player playing with one piece. Each piece begins in one of the doors: north/winter is yellow, west/spring is blue, south/summer is red, east/autumn is white. North and west move anti-clockwise around the circle, south and east move clockwise. Three sticks, red on one side and black on the other, used as dice, the throws are as follows: three red = 10, three black = 5, two red and one black = 3, two black and one red =2. A throw of 10 grants the player another throw. When a player lands on a spot occupied by an opponent, the opponent's piece is sent back to start. The first player to complete four circuits of the board wins. Circuits are usually counted with beans or corn.
Content "They were all used, as I am informed, by Mr. Cushing, for the game of Ta'sho'-li-we, or "wooden canes ' (one of the seven sacred games of Zuni), which he described to me as follows: Ta -sho'-li-we- is played according to the throws of three wooden blocks, painted red on one side and black upon the other, around a circle of stones placed upon the sand. Two or four players engage, using two or four splints as markers, and advancing, according to their throws around the circle which is divided into forty parts by pebbles or fragments of pottery, and has four openings called "doorways" at its four quarters. At the commencement of the game four colored splints are arranged at these points: at the top (North) a yellow splint; at the left (West) a blue; at the bottom (South) a red, and at the right (East) a white splint. The blocks are tossed ends down on a disk of sandstone placed in the middle of the circle, and the counts are as follows: 3 red sides up =10 3 black sides up = 5 2 red and one black = 3 2 black and one red = 2 A count of ten gives another throw. When four play, the straws of the North and West move around from right to left, and those of the South and East from left to right. When a player's move terminates at a division of the circle occupied by an adversary's straw, he takes it up and sends it back to the beginning. It is customary to make the circuit of the stones four times, beans or corn of different colors being used to count the number of times a player has gone around. The colors on the wooden blocks or dice symbolize the two conditions of men: Red, light or wakefulness; Black, darkness or sleep.The splints have the following symbolism: At top, yellow, north, air, Winter; At left, blue, west, water, Spring; At bottom, red, south, fire. Summer; At right, white, east, earth. Autumn." Culin 1898: 773-775.
Confidence 100
Source Culin, S. 1898. Chess and Playing-Cards. Washington: Government Printing Office.

Id DLP.Evidence.1686
Type Ethnography
Game Kolowis Awithlaknannai
Date 1907-01-01 - 1907-12-31
Rules A series of three parallel lines are drawn, with diagonals connecting the outer lines at intervals, crossing each other at the central line. Sixteen spaces in the outer rows, fifteen in the central row. Pieces begin on all of the points on the board, except the central point and the leftmost point of the central row. Pieces are moved along the intersections, and they are placed on the board on opposing sides, leaving the central spot empty. The first player moves to this spot along one of the lines, and the opponent jumps this pieces, thereby capturing it.
Content Zuni. Zuni, New Mexico. (Cat. no. 5049, Brooklyn Institute Museum.) Long stone slab, inscribed with the diagram shown in figure 111. This was found by the writer on a house top in Zuñi, and was explained by the natives as used in a game with white and black pieces, played like the preceding. The positions of the pieces at the beginning of the game are indicated by black and white circles. The name of the game was given as kolowis awithlaknannai, the kolowisi being a mythic serpent." Culin 1907: 801
Confidence 100
Ages Elder
Genders Male
Source Culin, S. 1907. Games of the North American Indians. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.

Id DLP.Evidence.1687
Type Ethnography
Game Kolowis Awithlaknannai
Date 1903-01-01 - 1903-12-31
Rules Stones are placed on intersections, on all except the center. The first player moves to the center, pieces are captured by jumping. Moves must be along the lines.
Content "AWE THLACNAWE. (" STONES KILL.") Implements. - A number of small stones (a different color for each side), and geometrical markings on a stone slab or on the ground. There is no specified size for the "board," it being larger or smaller according to the number of angles. The stones are placed on all the intersections of the geometrical drawing except the central one. The first player moves to the center, where his "man" is jumped by his opponent. The stones may be moved in any direction so long as the lines are followed." Stevenson 1903: 496-497.
Confidence 100
Source Stevenson, M. C. 1903. Zuñi Games. American Anthropologist 5(3): 468-497.

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