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Evidence in Thailand

9 pieces of evidence found.

Id DLP.Evidence.1248
Type Ethnography
Game Len Choa
Date 1836-01-01 - 1836-12-31
Rules Triangular board. Six pieces. The object is to hem in the opponent's piece(s) so they cannot move.
Content "Len choa is a game played with six counters placed within and on the lines of a triangle, or as may be agreed on the point, consists in hemming in the adversary's pieces so he cannot move." Low 1839: 380.
Confidence 100
Source Low, J. 1839. 'On Siamese Literature.' Asiatic Researches 20(2): 338-392.

Id DLP.Evidence.1289
Type Ethnography
Game Mak Ruk
Date 1839-01-01 - 1839-12-31
Rules 8x8 board. Ech player begins with sixteen pieces with special moves: Khoon (x1): moves orthogonally in any direction; Met (x1): placed to the right of the Khoon, moves one square orthogonally or diagonally forward, or one square diagonally backward, may move two squares orthogonally forward on the first move; Khon (x2): moves one square forward orthogonally or diagonally, may move backward diagonally but not to capture; Maa (x2): moves as a chess knight; Rooa (x2): moves orthogonally any distance; Bea (x8): move forward one space, but capture diagonally. When they reach the opposite edge of the board, they are promoted to Met. They begin on the third row of the board with respect to each player. When the Khoon is threatened, it is in check and the player's next move must be to remove the check. If the player cannot, it is checkmate and the player loses. If there are no legal moves, the game is a draw. If one player has only a king left, the opponent must checkmate it within a set number of turns, based on the highest ranking piece left on the board, minus the total number of pieces on the board. The values are: two Rooa: eight; one Rooa, sixteen, two Khon, 22; one Khon, 44; two Maa, 33; one Maa, 66; Met and two Bea, 88; one each of Met, Rooa, Maa, Khon, sixteen. With nnly a Met, the game is a draw.
Content "Mak rook or Chess—The Khoon or king has with the other pieces (with the exception of the pawns), the same relative positions as in the English game. He goes one square in any direction,m and takes in any direction. He cannot castle. He is check-mated much in the same manner as in the British game, but a stale-mate makes a drawn game. The Met or minister. [the queen with us] stands on the right hand of the King, can move two squares straight-forward at the outset—but after the first move he can only go one square at a time, and that diagonally either for advance or retreat. The Khon, " post or supporter," is the bishop. His first move is either one square forward or diagonally, but at any period of the game he may take the adversary's piece on the square before him, but not that one which may stand in his rear. Maa or the horse, is the knight and moves in the same wau as the English one. The rooa or ship is the Castle and moves in the same way as the latter. Bea or "cowries" (shells) are the pawns. They are ranged on the third square and move one square at a time, and only one at the outset, and take diagonally. When they reach the adversary's line of pawns they become Met or ministers and move accordingly,..The following are established rules. If a king is left alone to contend, his aim is to get so placed as to prevent being check mated within a certain number of moves. In the first place, however, the number of pieces actually on the board is deducted from the prescribed number of moves in each case. Thus, if the king has opposed to him a king and two castles—the number of pieces on the board four—is deducted from the prescribed number eight. If the adversary has only a castle, the prescribed number is sixteen. If he has two bishops—it is twenty-two. If with one forty-four. If with thtree knights thirty-three. If with one knight sixty-six. If with a met, it is a drawn game. If with a queen or met and two pawns eighty-eight moves; with a queen, bishop, knight, and castle, sixteen moves are prescribed." Low 1839: 374-379.
Confidence 100
Source Low, J. 1839. 'On Siamese Literature.' Asiatic Researches 20(2): 338-392.

Id DLP.Evidence.1290
Type Ethnography
Game Maak Yék
Date 1836-01-01 - 1836-12-31
Rules 8x8 board. Sixteen pieces per player. The pieces begin on the first and third rank or squares with respect to each player. Pieces move orthogonally any distance. Pieces are captured when surrounded on both sides by an enemy piece. Enemy pieces may also be taken if a piece moves into a space such that the enemy pieces are on either side of it. The goal is to capture all of the enemy's pieces.
Content "Maak yék is a game somewhat resembling draughts. It is played with thirty-two men—sixteen on a side— and arranged respectively on their first and third lines. The pieces move in square in all directions, the number not being limited. The object is to get one or more of the adversaries' pieces betwixt two of the players' ones, which, if there be no intervals between any of the confined and confining pieces, are taken—or if the draft piece stands with one of the adversaries' on each side of him, or with htese and others in his rear, he takes the whole." Low 1836: 382-383.
Confidence 100
Source Low, J. 1839. 'On Siamese Literature.' Asiatic Researches 20(2): 338-392.

Id DLP.Evidence.1695
Type Ethnography
Game Len Cúa Kín Ngoa
Date 1836-01-01 - 1836-12-31
Rules 4x4 board. One player plays as four tigers, which begin the board placed in the four corner spaces. The other player plays as twelve oxen. The first move is made by placing one of the oxen on an empty space, followed by a move by the tiger closest to the ox. Once all of the oxen are placed, the players alternate turns moving their pieces on the board. Pieces move to an empty adjacent spot orthogonally. Pieces may capture another piece by hopping over an adjacent piece to an empty space immediately on the opposite side of it. Tigers capture orthogonally, oxen capture diagonally. Oxen may also capture a tiger by blocking it from being able to move. The oxen win by reducing the tigers to two.
Content "The Len cúa kín ngoa.-The game of "the tigers eating cattle." In this game there are four tigers and twelve oxen The board has sixteen squares. The tigers are placed at the four corners-an ox is placed on one square, and the nearest tiger moves first. The tigers take by leaping over the heads of the oxen to the open square behind them and not diagonally. The tigers are taken and put off the board when hemmed in so that they cannot move, or they are taken then by the oxen moving (only then) diagonally. If only two tigers are left on the board the oxen are victors." Low 1839: 379-380.
Confidence 100
Ages Adult
Genders Female, Male
Source Low, J. 1839. 'On Siamese Literature.' Asiatic Researches 20(2): 338-392.

Id DLP.Evidence.1696
Type Ethnography
Game Len Doat
Date 1836-01-01 - 1836-12-31
Rules Four 3x5 grids, arranged in four corners of a rectangular board. Three pieces per player. Five cowrie shells used as dice; the value of the throw equaling the number of the mouths which land face up. Players begin by entering their pieces onto the board from the square in the central row of the grid to their right. A single piece may be entered with a throw of 1, or all of the player's pieces may be entered with a throw of 5.Throws of 1 and 5 grant the player another throw, and a pieces are moved only after all of the players throws are made. Play proceeds down the central row where the pieces entered, in an anti-clockwise direction until reaching the bottom right hand corner of the left grid, at which point the track continues on the opponent's side of the board from the top right corner of the left board (with respect to the current player), proceeding around the opponent's grids in an anti-clockwise direction until reaching the top left square of the opponent's right grid. At this point, the piece returns to the player's own right grid, on the bottom left corner, and proceeding in an anti-clockwise direction into the central row, and off the board once moving past the final space. When a player lands on a space occupied by an opponent's piece, the opponent's piece is removed from the board and must re-enter as before. Pieces are safe from being sent back when resting on the left two corners of each grid on the left and the right two corners of each grid on the right. The first player to remove all of their pieces from the board wins.
Content "Len Doat resembles the Indian game of puchees. It is played with cowrie shells on a lacquered board thus. Two persons take each a side of the board. There are five cowrie shells for a dice, each of the players has three pieces-each throws in turn, and if No. 1 or No. 5, casts up, the thrower continues to throw and to play until another number turns up. The chief object is to pass through all one's own squares and those of the opposite party without interruption-taking his men if they can be overtaken by throwing a corresponding number and leaping over them if the number cast up exceeds. He whose pieces are thus first returned to the place whence they set out, wins the game. Nos. 6, 15, 17, and 26 in each side are castles, and the piece holding one of these cannot be taken. The pieces which have been taken are entered again by casting the dice-No. 1 enters one- No. 5 the whole which are out, but the intermediate numbers do not enter any." Low 1839: 379.
Confidence 100
Source Low, J. 1839. 'On Siamese Literature.' Asiatic Researches 20(2): 338-392.

Id DLP.Evidence.1697
Type Ethnography
Game Mak Yep
Date 1836-01-01 - 1836-12-31
Rules Board with sixteen squares. Seven pieces per player. One player must remove five counters so that at no point can the other player capture one of the pieces by hopping over it.
Content "Mak Yep is a game played with fourteen counters on sixteen squares- one of the players must take off five counters, so that he shall not leave one on the board in a situation to be taken-for if one is so situated that it can go over the head of another to an empty square the first player loses." Low 1839: 380.
Confidence 100
Source Low, J. 1839. 'On Siamese Literature.' Asiatic Researches 20(2): 338-392.

Id DLP.Evidence.1698
Type Ethnography
Game Mak Khom
Date 1836-01-01 - 1836-12-31
Rules 2x7 board. Seven counters in each hole. Sowing occurs in an anti-clockwise direction. In the first move, each player takes the contents of the leftmost hole and sows them except for the last counter, which is set aside. When sowing, players may take the entire contents of a hole, or only part of them. The players agree on a number of counters which need to be captured in order to win.
Content "Mak khom is a trough with seven cups on each side. The players have each forty-nine counters distributed equally in the cups, i.e., seven each. Each takes out the contents of his first cup, and counts them out to the right hand to the last number,-setting aside the counter which remains. They then begin with the second number, and , when its contents have been told out, they respectively take out of the cups (amongst which the last told out counter falls) their contents, and proceed to count as before. They may take the whole of the number in any cup, or only part of it. The parties agree that after a certain number has been won by one of them the game shall cease-as it may be immoderately lengthened out." Low 1839: 380.
Confidence 100
Source Low, J. 1839. 'On Siamese Literature.' Asiatic Researches 20(2): 338-392.

Id DLP.Evidence.1700
Type Ethnography
Game Len Saké
Date 1836-01-01 - 1836-12-31
Rules 2x12 board, divided in half as in Backgammon. Played with dice. Pieces enter the board according to the throws of the dice into the left hand side of the board. All pieces must be entered onto the board before they may begin moving. Movement occurs in an anti-clockwise direction. Once they can move, an opponent's piece which is alone on a point can be taken when one of the player's pieces lands on that point. The first player to have a piece captured loses.
Content "Len saké is played with counters like Backgammon-the moves being regulated by dice. The box has the same number of marks as the European one, and indeed the game bers such a close resemblance to our Backgammon, that it may be perhaps supposed to have been taught to them by European traders. The men are not placed in the box at the outset, but are kept in a heap in the chequers of the players, which first are to the left hand of each. The pieces are filled into the respective chequers according to the casts of the dice-and they range to the right when the whole numbers have been filled in. After this they may take up any uncovered counter of the adversary which generally terminates the game. The chief aim is to prevent a piece being uncovered." Low 1839: 380-381.
Confidence 100
Source Low, J. 1839. 'On Siamese Literature.' Asiatic Researches 20(2): 338-392.

Id DLP.Evidence.1794
Type Ethnography
Game Sua Ghin Gnua
Date 1898-01-01 - 1898-12-31
Rules 5x5 intersecting lines. Likely to be a hunt game.
Content "In Siam we find the game of Sua ghin gnua, or "Tiger and Oxen." Culin 1898: 876. Culin infers that it is the same game as Lay Gwet Kyah.
Confidence 100
Source Culin, S. 1898. Chess and Playing-Cards. Washington: Government Printing Office.

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