background Ludii Portal
Home of the Ludii General Game System

   

Home Games Forum Downloads References Concepts Contribute Tutorials Tournaments World Map Ludemes About


 
Evidence in Syria

4 pieces of evidence found.

Id DLP.Evidence.1533
Type Ethnography
Game La'b Akila
Date 1896-01-01 - 1896-12-31
Rules 2x7 board. Seven counters in each hole. Sowing occurs in an anti-clockwise direction. When the final counter falls into an occupied hole, the contents of that hole are picked up and sowing continues. If the final counter falls into a hole containing one or three counters, the player captures those counters, plus any counters in the hole in the opposite row, as well as the contents of any holes in an unbroken sequence following the one in which the final counter which also contain two or four counters.When the final counter falls into an empty hole, the turn ends. Play continues until all of the pieces are captured. The player who captured the most counters wins.
Content "La'b hakimi, the "Rational game," or La'b akila, the "Intelligent game," is so called in contrast to the preceding. Success in it depends largely upon the skill of the players. In this game it is customary in Syria to put seven pieces in each hole. The players, instead of first taking from the hole on their right, may select any hole on their side of the board as a starting place. They calculate the holle in which the last piece will fall, and the result depends largely upon this calculation." Culin 1896: 598.
Confidence 100
Source Culin, S. 1896. Mancala, the National Game of Africa. Washington: Government Printing Office.

Id DLP.Evidence.1770
Type Ethnography
Game Mughrabieh
Date 1974-01-01 - 1974-12-31
Rules The game is played on a board with twelve points on either side. The points form a continuous track in a horseshoe shape; each player progresses in opposite directions (one from their bottom right to the top right, the other from their bottom left to their top left. Each player has 15 pieces. Each player's fifteen pieces begin on the first point of their track. Players move according to the number on each die by moving one piece the value on one die then another piece the value on the other die, or by moving one piece the value of one die and then the value of the other. If doubles are rolled, the player must play the number on each die twice. A piece cannot land on a space occupied by one of the opponent's pieces. A player must first move a single one of their pieces around the board and onto one of the final six points of their track before moving any of the other pieces. When all of the player's pieces are on the final six points, they may be borne off the board. The player who bears off all of their pieces wins. The winning player's score equals the number of the opponent's pieces which are left on the board. Play continues until one player's score reaches 31.
Content Detailed description of Mughrabieh in Barakat 1974: 16-18.
Confidence 100
Ages All
Social status Non-Elite, Elite
Spaces Inside, Public, Private, Communal
Genders Female, Male
Source Barakat, R. 1974. Tawula: Study in Arabic Folklore. Helsinki: Academia Scientiarum Fennica.

Id DLP.Evidence.1771
Type Ethnography
Game Mahbouseh
Date 1974-01-01 - 1974-12-31
Rules The game is played on a board with twelve points on either side. The points form a continuous track in a horseshoe shape; each player progresses in opposite directions (one from their bottom right to the top right, the other from their bottom left to their top left. Each player has 15 pieces. Each player's fifteen pieces begin on the first point of their track. Players move according to the number on each die by moving one piece the value on one die then another piece the value on the other die, or by moving one piece the value of one die and then the value of the other. If doubles are rolled, the player must play the number on each die twice. When a piece lands on a space occupied by one of the opponent's piece, the opponent's piece may not move from that spot until the player's piece is moved from that spot. Two or more of the opponent's pieces may land on this space, but another of the player's pieces may not. When all of the player's pieces are on the final six points, they may be borne off the board. The player who bears off all of their pieces wins. The winning player's score equals the number of the opponent's pieces which are left on the board. Play continues until one player's score reaches 31.
Content Detailed description of Mahbouseh in Barakat 1974: 18-19.
Confidence 100
Ages All
Social status Non-Elite, Elite
Spaces Inside, Public, Private, Communal
Genders Female, Male
Source Barakat, R. 1974. Tawula: Study in Arabic Folklore. Helsinki: Academia Scientiarum Fennica.

Id DLP.Evidence.1772
Type Ethnography
Game Yahoudieh
Date 1974-01-11 - 1974-12-31
Rules 2x12 board, with spaces as points, divided in two. Fifteen pieces per player, which start stacked, two on the players' first three points and three in the next three points, Two six-sided dice. Players unstack the pieces by moving pieces off of the stack, but remaining on the same point, according to the throws of the dice. The value of the throw indicates the number of the point which can be unstacked. For example, a throw of 1 and 4 allows the player to unstack the pieces on points 1 and 4. When all of a player's pieces are unstacked, they must be restacked, in the same way. When they have been successfully restacked, the player then bears off the pieces from this quadrant of the board. When bearing off, players move according to the number on each die by moving one piece the value on one die then another piece the value on the other die, or by moving one piece the value of one die and then the value of the other. The first player to bear off all their pieces wins.
Content Detailed description of Yahoudieh in Barakat 1974: 19-21.
Confidence 100
Ages Child
Genders Female, Male
Source Barakat, R. 1974. Tawula: Study in Arabic Folklore. Helsinki: Academia Scientiarum Fennica.

     Contact Us
     ludii.games@gmail.com
     cameron.browne@maastrichtuniversity.nl

lkjh Maastricht University Data Science and Knowledge Engineering (DKE), Paul-Henri Spaaklaan 1, 6229 EN Maastricht, Netherlands Funded by a €2m ERC Consolidator Grant (#771292) from the European Research Council