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Evidence in Somaliland

6 pieces of evidence found.

Id DLP.Evidence.699
Type Ethnography
Game Leyla Gobale (Somaliland)
Date 1931-01-01 - 1931-12-31
Rules 2x6, 8, or 12 board. Four counters in each hole. Play begins from a player's righthand hole and counters are sown clockwise. After this, a player may begin sowing from any hole in their row. When the final counter falls into an occupied hole, the counters in that hole are picked up and sowing continues. If the final counter falls into an empty hole, the turn ends; if this hole is in the player's own row, the contents of the opponent's hole are captured if they contain one, two, four, or more counters. If it contains three counters, one of the opponent's counters is taken and placed into the hole where sowing ended, so that each now has two counters. These holes cannot be sown from for the rest of the game and are owned by the player whose turn created them. Play ends when one player can no longer play. The opponent then takes all of the counters in their own row, and each player takes the counters that have accumulated in their captured holes. The player with the most counters wins.
Content "5. leyla-gòbale. Related to the Arabian manqala, and to similar games found over thee greater part of Africa and India. Two parallel rows of 6, 8, or 12 holes are dug in the ground, and four balls of dry camel dung are dropped in each hole. Each of the two players takes possession of one row. The first one to play takes the contents of the hole at the right end of his own row (A) then distributes one ball in each of the followin pits: B, C, D, E; then he picks up the contents of the hole in which he has dropped his last ball (E), and distributes them in F,G, H, IJ; he distributes the contents of J in K, L, A< B, C; those of C in D, E, F, G, H, I, those of I in J, K, L, A, B, C. As his last ball drops in an empty hole (in C), together with the one which lies opposite (in J), and hiss opponent starts playing. Both players are henceforth free to start their turn at whichever hole they like, providing it belongs to their own row. When a player ends his turn in one of his opponent's holes he takes nother (abar, "famine"). When he ends it in one of his own holes, he looks at the opponent's hole which lies directly opposite; if the latter is empty he gets nothing (abar); if it contains 1, 2, 4, or more balls, he takes these, together with the one he has dropped last; but if it contains 3 balls, one of these is removed into the hole where his last ball dropped, so that each contains two balls; these two holes are now his 'ur, and any ball that drops into either of them cannot be touched until the end of the game, when they are taken by the owner of the 'ur. When a player is unable to play, owing to the fact that all his holes are empty-with the possible exception of some 'ur which cannot be touched-his opponent can take all that remains in his own row, always excepting the contents of any 'ur which may belong to the first. The object of the game is to secure the larger number of balls." Marin 1931: 506-507.
Confidence 100
Source Marin, G. 1931. Somali Games. Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland. 61: 499-511.

Id DLP.Evidence.868
Type Ethnography
Game Shantarad
Date 1931-01-01 - 1931-12-31
Rules 5 x 5 board, players take turns placing two pieces at a time, move orthogonally, custodial capture.
Content "3. Shantarad (Issaq)=bub(Darod) . Related to Arabian siga and Japanese gp. It is played on a checker of 5 x 5 squares drawn on the ground. Each of the two players provides himself with a set of 12 stones of distinctive colour, and places two stones at a time on whichever free square he chooses, with the exception of the centre one (called deh, "centre"). When the twenty-four stones are placed, the person who put the last couplr has the first move. The stones are shifted to any adjacent square, but never diagonally. If by so moving a player can place one of his opponent's stones between two of his own, he removes it from the game, and can go on playing as long as he sees the possibility of taking pieces by single moves. The accompanying figure shows how three stones can be taken by a single move (by shifting white stone as indicated by the arrow). On the other hand, a player can saely place one of his own stones between two of his opponent's. A stone in the deh cannot be taken. When a player is unable to move, his opponent must give him an opening by making an extra move." Marin 1931: 595–596.
Confidence 100
Source Marin, G. 1931. Somali Games. Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland. 61: 499-511.

Id DLP.Evidence.1529
Type Ethnography
Game Shah
Date 1931-01-01 - 1931-12-31
Rules Three concentric circles, with the midpoints of their sides connected with lines. Twelve pieces per player. Players take turns placing one of their pieces on an empty point on the board. The first player to make three in a row obtains the privilege of starting the next phase after all of the stones are placed; if no one makes three in a row the last player to place a stone begins the next phase. Ones all of the stones are placed, the player who has the right to begin the next phase removes any one of the opponent's stones, and the opponent does the same with one of the player's pieces. Then, players alternate turns moving one of their pieces to an empty adjacent space. When a player place three of their pieces in a row, they remove one of the opponent's pieces. If a player moves in such a way that the opponent cannot move, the player must make an extra move to allow the opponent a place to play. A player cannot capture an opponent's piece when this extra move is made. The player who captures all but two of the opponent's pieces wins. Games are usually played in sequence, starting with the winner of the previous game, with the first player to win five games in a row being the winner.
Content "Shah. This game is related to the old English "Nine Men's Morris" which was introduced into Europe by the Moors. Shah might be termed the national game of the Somali; men as well as children are passionately fond of it. Three concentric squares are drawn on the groun, their sides being connected at their middle point by perpendicular (transversal) lines. Two distinctive sets of twelve stones are used instead of two sets of nine, as in the European variety. They are placed, one at a time, by the two players alternately. During this introductory staage there is no taking of pieces, but the one who is first able to place three of his stones in a straight connected line...secures the privilege of starting the game proper. If neither player manages to do this, it is the one who has placed the last stone who begins. He first removes one of his opponent's stones at his choice, and the opponent does likewise. After this, the game becomes very similar to the old English game; the stones are shifted along the lines from one angle or intersection to a neighbouring one which is vacant, and every time a dzare is formed, it gives the right to remove any one of the opponent's stones. Should one of the players make it impossible for his opponent to move... he must make an extra move to provide an opening, and cannot avail himself of any dzare he might be making by this second move. Jumping is unknown...Each subsequent game is started by the winner of the previous one." Marin 1931: 503-504.
Confidence 100
Ages Child, Adult
Genders Male
Source Marin, G. 1931. Somali Games. Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland. 61: 499-511.

Id DLP.Evidence.1530
Type Ethnography
Game Koruböddo
Date 1931-01-01 - 1931-12-31
Rules 5x5 board. Twelve pieces per player, arranged in the two rows in front of each player, and in the right two squares in the central row (the central space is empty). Players alternate turns moving a piece to an adjacent orthogonal space. The player may capture an opponent's piece by hopping over it in an orthogonal direction. Multiple hops are allowed in the same turn, but captures are not compulsory, The player who captures all of their opponent's pieces wins.
Content "4. krouböddo, "high jumo"=korkaböd, "jump over". Related to the Arabian dameh, and to the European draughts. It is played with two sets of twelve stones on a checker similar to that of shantarad. At the beginning of the game, the stones are disposed as shown in the accompanying figure. The stones move as in shantarad, but they take an opponent's piece by jumping over it (not diagonally). As in our own draughts they can take several pieces in succession. There are no "kings." Taking is not compulsory." Marin 1931: 506.
Confidence 100
Source Marin, G. 1931. Somali Games. Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland. 61: 499-511.

Id DLP.Evidence.1531
Type Ethnography
Game Djara-Badakh
Date 1931-01-01 - 1931-12-31
Rules 3x3 intersecting lines. Three pieces per player. Players alternate turns placing a piece on an empty spot on the board. When all of the pieces are placed, players alternate turns moving a piece to an empty adjacent spot. The first player to place their three pieces along one of the lines wins.
Content "2. Djara-badakh. A simple for of shah, played by children. Each of the two players has three stones of distinctive colour and kind. These are placed alternately by them on angles formed by three vertical and horizontal lines. When the six stones are placed, they are moved along the lines. The first who gets his stones in a straight connected line wins the game." Marin 1931: 505.
Confidence 100
Ages Child
Source Marin, G. 1931. Somali Games. Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland. 61: 499-511.

Id DLP.Evidence.1821
Type Ethnography
Game Bakkis
Date 1856-01-01 - 1856-12-31
Rules Name of the game. Played similarly to Pachisi.
Content "Citizens and the more civilized are fond of "Bakkis," which, as its name denotes, is a corruption of the well-known Indian Pachisi." Burton 1856: 30.
Confidence 100
Source Burton, R. 1856. First footprints in East Africa. London: Tylston.

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