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Evidence in Holland 1805

4 pieces of evidence found.

Id DLP.Evidence.1617
Type Contemporary text
Game The Babylonian
Date 1805-01-01 - 1805-12-31
Rules 10x10 checkered board. Twenty pieces per player, arranged on the four rows closest to the player. Pieces move orthogonally or diagonally in any direction, only on the white spaces. Pieces may capture by jumping over an enemy piece to an empty space on the other side of it. The player to capture all of the opponent's pieces wins.
Content " the game is now disused except in Holland, where it is still played." Twiss 1805: 172-173.
Confidence 100
Source Twiss, R. 1805. Miscellanies in Two Volumes. London: Twiss.

Id DLP.Evidence.1622
Type Contemporary text
Game Maleys
Date 1805-01-01 - 1805-12-31
Rules 10x10 board. Twenty pieces per player, which begin in the four rows closest to the players. Pieces move diagonally forward one space. Pieces capture orthogonally or diagonally, when there is one empty pace between the piece and the opponent's piece, and an empty space immediately on the opposite side of the opponent's piece. Pieces are promoted to Queen when they reach the edge of the board opposite from where they start. Queens may capture orthogonally or diagonally in any direction. They may also move orthogonally or diagonally any distance. The player who captures all of the opponent's pieces wins.
Content "Two other games are played in Holland, likewise on the board with a hundred squares, and forty Men , one called the Maleys, Malayan, probably from its originating in some of the Dutch settlements in the East-Indies, although it appears to have been taken from the Babylonian game. The Pawns take straight on like the Chess-rook , and also Diagonally, in which last manner only they can move when not taking, but there must be an open square between the two Pawns as well as one behind the Pawn to be taken . Supposing nine Black Pawns to be placed on 26 , 7 , 4 , 25, 33, 23, 30, 44, and 38 , a White Pawn in 46 , might take them all successively in as many moves, going over them on the squares 16 , 2 , 5 , 35, 32, 19, 35, 49 and 32. If five Black were on 16, 44, 30 , 18 . and 8 , a White Queen would seize all ; placing herself on the squares 6, 50 , 20 , 17 and 3 . So that if a Black Queen be placed on 41, and three of her Men on 13, 22 , 38 ; and a White Queen on 37 , with three Pawns 19, 23, 28 , none of these can take each other, because there is no vacant square between them . The Queen at all times may move as she takes, from 46 to 6 , or to any of the three intermediate squares. The same from 46 to 50, or from 46 to 5 , or to any of the Eight on that line, & c. These situations are merely to exemplify the moves." Twiss 1805: 173-175.
Confidence 100
Ages Adult
Social status Elite
Genders Male
Source Twiss, R. 1805. Miscellanies in Two Volumes. London: Twiss.

Id DLP.Evidence.1627
Type Contemporary text
Game Unnamed Dutch Draughts Game
Date 1805-01-01 - 1805-12-31
Rules 10x10 board. Twenty pieces per player, which begin on the four rows closest to the player. The row of pieces on the edge of the board closest to each player begins with the pieces already as Queens. Pieces move diagonally one space forward, or can jump an adjacent piece belonging to the opponent to capture it. Captures are mandatory, and the maximum number of captures possible must be taken. When pieces reach the opposite edge of the board from where they started, they are promoted to Queen. Queens move any number of spaces diagonally, and jump over any number of opponents' pieces over any distance. When a Queen reaches that edge of the board a second time (or, for the first time if one of those which began the game as a Queen), they are further promoted, gaining the power to move and take orthogonally over any distance. The player who captures all of the opponent's pieces wins.
Content "The other game (of which I know not the name,) is with five Queens on the back line 46 to 50 , and 'ten Pawns, against the adversary's similar forces. The rules are the same as in the Polish game, with the addition that all the original Queens who enter the line where the Pawns become Queens, have each another Pawn placed on their heads, and are immediately additionally empowered to move and take like the Chess -rook . And the same privilege is granted to those Queens who become so , from being Pawns, as soon as they, in the course of playing, rest a second time on that line." Twiss 1805: 175.
Confidence 100
Ages Adult
Genders Male
Source Twiss, R. 1805. Miscellanies in Two Volumes. London: Twiss.

Id DLP.Evidence.1668
Type Ethnography
Game Driesticken
Date 1694-01-01 - 1694-12-31
Rules 3x3 intersecting lines. Three pieces per player. Players alternate turns placing pieces on an empty spot on the board. When all pieces are placed, players alternate turns moving a piece to any empty spot on the board. The first player to place their pieces in an orthogonal row along the lines wins.
Content "Alias autem Belgis est aliud nomen et duplex forma; minor dicta Driesticken" Hyde 1694: 204.
Confidence 100
Source Hyde, T. 1694. De Ludis Orientalibus Libri Duo: Historia Nerdiludii, hoc est Dicere, Trunculorum, cum quibuidam aliis Arabum, Persarum, Indorum, Chinensium, & aliarum Gentium Ludis tam Politicis quam Bellicis, plerumque Europae inauditis, multo minus visis: additis omnium Nominibus in dictarum Gentium Linguis. Ubi etiam Classicorum Graecorum & Latinorum loca quaedam melius quam hactenus factum est explicantur. Oxford: E Theatro Sheldoniano.

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