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Evidence for Aasha

4 pieces of evidence found.

Id DLP.Evidence.1606
Type Artifact
Location 9°55'51.42"N, 76°16'1.90"E
Date 1920-01-01 - 1985-12-31
Rules 3x5 rectangle, with an extension of five squares from the central row. The final square in the long row is marked with an X. Two players. Twelve cowrie shells per player, as pieces.
Content Wooden board dating to about 1920, given to the Israel Museum in 1985 by Mr. and Mrs. Sadoo Koder. 3x5 rectangle, with an extension of five squares from the central row. The final square in the long row is marked with an X. Two large oval holes on either side of the long row.. 24 cowrie shells.Brafman 1985: 98; Finkel 1999: 8-9.
Confidence 100

Id DLP.Evidence.1607
Type Artifact
Location 9°55'51.42"N, 76°16'1.90"E
Date 1920-01-01 - 1985-12-31
Rules 3x5 rectangle, with an extension of five squares from the central row. The final square in the long row is marked with an X. Two players. Twelve cowrie shells per player, as pieces.
Content Wooden board dating to about 1920, given to the Israel Museum in 1985 by Mr. and Mrs. Sadoo Koder. 3x5 rectangle, with an extension of five squares from the central row. The final square in the long row is marked with an X. Two large oval holes on either side of the long row.. 24 cowrie shells.Brafman 1985: 98; Finkel 1999: 8-9.
Confidence 100
Source Brafman, O. 1985. "Field Work in India among the Jewish Communities: December 1982-February 1983." Israel Museum Journal 4: 93-98., Finkel, I. 1999. " The Sedentary Games of India: An Introduction. In R. Nirbed and A. Gosh (eds.), Sedentary Games of India." Kolkata: Asiatic Society, 1-21.

Id DLP.Evidence.1844
Type Contemporary rule description
Location 9°55'51.42"N, 76°16'1.90"E
Date 1912-12-01 - 1995-12-31
Rules Twelve pieces per player. Five cowrie shells, one of which is broken on one side, used as dice. pieces "kill" one anther.
Content "The ladies and girls usually played a game called aasha during that season. We made circles on a piece of plank, something like the game of danka. Aasha is played with twelve small shells for each of the two players. You throw five larger cowrie shells with one of them broken on the back, and you move the shells according to the number you get from the throw...this game of twelve killing each other..." Daniel and Johnson 1995: 162.
Confidence 100
Ages Child, Adult
Genders Female
Source Daniel, R. and B. Johnson. 1995. Ruby of Cochin: An Indian Jewish Woman Remembers. Philadelphia: The Jewish Publication Society.

Id DLP.Evidence.1845
Type Ethnography
Location 9°55'51.42"N, 76°16'1.90"E
Date 1912-12-01 - 1995-12-31
Rules 3x5 board with a 5 square extension of the central track. The final track of the central row is marked with an X. Two oval depressions on either side of the long track. Twelve pieces per player. Pieces are entered into the oval depressions first, then onto the grid, each player from opposite corners and proceeding down the outer row and to the central track, and then off the board.
Content "For the moment is may be noted that the name of the game is "aasha," and that these rules do indeed dovetail closely with those recovered from Babylonian antiquity. Play follows the projected route assumed above, and involves a two-part strategy, that requires first getting the pieces into a special oval place on the board before they can be entered onto the track. The pieces, now cowrie shells twelve in number, are all identical to one another, while larger cowries function as dice to move the pieces." Finkel 1999: 10, fig. III.
Confidence 100
Ages Child, Adult
Genders Female
Source Finkel, I. 1999. " The Sedentary Games of India: An Introduction. In R. Nirbed and A. Gosh (eds.), Sedentary Games of India." Kolkata: Asiatic Society, 1-21.

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