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Evidence for Owasokotz

2 pieces of evidence found.

Id DLP.Evidence.1583
Type Ethnography
Location 35° 2'11.93"N,107°22'57.77"W
Date 1907-01-01 - 1907-12-31
Rules Forty stones arranged in a circle, with a larger gap after every tenth stone. These gaps are known as doors. Any number of players, each player begins with one piece, which begins at the east door. Three sticks used as dice, black on one side, white on the other, with one stick notched on the white side. The throws are as follows: two black with one notched white side up = 15; three white sides up = 10; two black and one white, not notched = 3, two white and one black = 2, three black = 5. Throws of 10 and 15 grant the player another throw. Players may move in either direction around the circle. To win, the player must complete a circuit of the board and pass the east door. If they land exactly on the east door, they must complete another circuit.
Content "Laguna, New Mexico. ( Cat. no. 61819, Field Columbian Museum.) Three flat wooden blocks, 4 by If inches, with one side plain and one side painted red. One of The block has fifteen notches, ten of which are on one edge and five on the other, as shown in figure 127. Collected by Dr C. E. Lukens. The following detailed account of the game, under the name of owasokotz, which was furnished by the collector, appears on the museum label : The game is played with three billets of wood, painted black on one side, white on the other, one of the white sides having fifteen notches on it, the other plain. Each player has a small stick to use as a marker, formerly known as o-poia-nia-ma, but of late called a horse, " because it goes so fast ; " a flat stone, the size of the hand, used as a center stone, upon which the billets are dropped ; and forty small stones, the size of a hen's egg. These forty stones are placed on the ground in the form of a circle, with four openings, or doors, called si-am-ma, always facing the four cardinal points. The play always begins at the east door, but after that they play whichever way they choose. Bach player may go a different way if he chooses ; as many as wish can play, or they may play partners. At the beginning of the play the horses are placed at the east door. A player takes up the billets and, placing the ends even with one hand, strikes them ends down on the center stone like dice ; the count is determined by the manner of the fall, and he then moves his horses up 'as many stones as he makes ; if he gets around to the starting point first, he wins. There are two ways of playing one is called pass, the other enter. In pass, if one makes a score which lands him exactly in the starting, or east, door, he must go around again until he lauds in the proper place....The blocks may fall within or without the ring. If one block should fall on edge, not leaning, then the player lays it on the center stone and strikes it with another billet, but if the notched billet is lying face down, it must not be used to strike with ; when the notched block stands on edge it must be picked up and thrown on the center stone. The count is as follows: Two black sides up, with one white notched, 15 stones ; three white sides up, 10 (when a player makes 10 or 15 he may strike again, and as many times as he makes these large numbers) ; two blacks up and one white, not notched, 3; two white and one black up, 2 ; three blacks up, 5." CUlin 1907: 121-122.
Confidence 100
Source Culin, S. 1907. Games of the North American Indians. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.

Id DLP.Evidence.1584
Type Ethnography
Location 35° 2'11.93"N,107°22'57.77"W
Date 1907-01-01 - 1907-12-31
Rules When a player's piece lands on a space occupied by an opponent's piece, the opponent's piece is sent back to the east door. The first player to reach the east door after making a circuit, whether passing it or landing exactly on it, the player wins.
Content "In enter, if A should land his horse on the top of his opponent's horse, he kills him, and he goes back to the beginning, but if A reaches the starting point first, he falls in and wins, even if the number of stones made should carry him beyond. The count otherwise is just the same in both. " Culin 1907: 122.
Confidence 100
Source Culin, S. 1907. Games of the North American Indians. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.

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