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Evidence for Bagh Guti

2 pieces of evidence found.

Id DLP.Evidence.1172
Type Ethnography
Location 25°12'35.98"N, 80°55'11.08"E
Date 1906-01-01 - 1906-12-31
Rules 5x5 board, played on intersections, with lines forming a diamond shape connecting the midpoints of the edges of the board. One player plays with two tiger pieces, placed on the midpoints of two opposite sides. The other player plays with twenty goats, divided into four stacks of five, placed on the next adjacent spot to the tigers on the diamond. The goats move first. Goats may move one at a time to any adjacent vacant spot. The tiger may move in the same manner, but also may capture a piece by hopping over it. Multiple captures can be made on the same turn with subsequent hops, but only the top goat in a stack is captured when a tiger leaps over it. The goal of the goats is to surround the tigers so they cannot move; the goal of the tigers is to capture all the goats.
Content "Bagh ugtti. Yet another variant is that known as "Bagh Gutti." It is played by two players on a board of 25 spaces, arranged as in the annexed diagram. (Fig. 6.) On A and B are placed two large piecesm, usually of kankar or tiles. These are called bagh ("tigers"). The other player has 20 smaller pieces. These he places, five on each of the spaces numbered (1), (2), (3), and (4). his object is to surrounf the "baghs" as to prevent them from moving in any direction: while their object is to capture all his "men." The player with the 20 "men" has the first move. he takes one piece from any of the four heaps and moves it on to any contiguous space in the same rank, file or diagonal. He may move one space at a time in any direction, provided that the space to which he moves is vacant. The bagh then moves. He may move one space at a time in any direction, and captures, as in draughts, by leaping over the peice to be captured. He can, however, only take one "man" at each leap, no matter how many men there may be on the space over which he leaps. He may capture any number of "men" in succession." Humphries 1906: 123-124.
Confidence 100
Source Humphries, E. de M. 1906. Notes on "Pachesi" and similar games, as played in the Karwi Subdivision, United Provinces. Journal and Proceedings of the Asiatic Society of Bengal. 2(4): 117–127.

Id DLP.Evidence.1447
Type Ethnography
Location 23°41'19.71"N, 86°57'58.11"E 23°13'56.78"N, 87°51'41.20"E 22°25'32.57"N, 87°19'11.70"E 23°10'27.77"N, 88°33'37.61"E 23°15'52.06"N, 88°26'17.53"E 22°50'44.31"N, 89°32'25.16"E 22°42'4.09"N, 90°21'9.73"E
Date 1933-01-01 - 1933-12-31
Rules 5x5 board, played on intersections, with lines forming a diamond shape connecting the midpoints of the edges of the board. One player plays with two tiger pieces, placed on the midpoints of two opposite sides. The other player plays with twenty goats, divided into four stacks of five, placed on the next adjacent spot to the tigers on the diamond.
Content "Bagh-bandi. The diagram used in playing the game of Bagh-bandi is shown in figure 4. As its name indicates, it is a kind of tiger-play.
Confidence 100
Ages Elder
Genders Male
Source Datta, J. 'A few types of sedentary games of Lower Bengal.' Journal and Proceedings of the Asiatic Society of Bengal. 29(1): 167–170.

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